About Alzheimer’s

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EVERYONE WITH A BRAIN IS AT RISK FOR ALZHEIMER'S

EVERY 67 SECONDS someone in the United States develops the disease.

Alzheimer’s disease is a degenerative brain disease and the most common cause of dementia. It accounts for an estimated 60 percent to 80 percent of dementia cases. In Alzheimer’s disease, nerve cell damage eventually affects parts of the brain that enable a person to carry out basic bodily functions. Difficulty remembering recent conversations, names or events is often an early clinical symptom; apathy and depression are also often early symptoms. Later symptoms include impaired communication, disorientation, confusion, poor judgment, behavior changes and, ultimately, difficulty speaking, swallowing and walking. These declines occur because nerve cells in parts of the brain involved in cognitive function have been damaged and no longer function normally.

Here are Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures according to the Alzheimer’s Association, the world’s leading nonprofit health organization focusing on Alzheimer’s research:

Quick Facts

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